Tag Archives: terms of endearment

He Ran Out of Gas

It’s Monday and I’m reflecting on all the wonderful weekend moments.  How is it that Friday-Saturday-Sunday passes so quickly and Monday seems to drag on so slowly?  It’s the beginning of the week and I already feel out of gas.

 

Jim writes to Mary shortly after he returns to Columbia from visiting her in Jefferson City.    Sweet moments recollected in his correspondence filled with sweet nothings.  Oh, and it sounds like he ran out of gas…literally.  At least they were well chaperoned!

 

Postmark Columbia, MO

April 28, 1930  5 PM

 

Monday

 

Dear Mary-

 

I got here about forty five minutes ago so I’m afraid there won’t be much of interest to tell you this time.  Maybe tomorrow there will be.  I hope so.

 

I surely enjoyed the weekend with you darling.  That slipped.  Really though it seems that every time I am with you I enjoy it more than I did the time before.  “Funny dear what love can do.”  Now isn’t it? —

 

I hope your Aunts didn’t think I had gone crazy or something similar yesterday.  Really though, I don’t know how they felt, but I enjoyed the bridge game immensely.  Next time, I’ll try to act so that the rest can enjoy it.  Do you suppose I could do that?  I hope that you aren’t too tired by night.  Take care of yourself this week and don’t go until you can’t go any more.  That is no nice way to act is it.

 

I hope that your father didn’t get too disgusted last night that he won’t go anyplace else with us.  Really Mary-I would hate that.  Tell him that it probably won’t happen again in ten years.  I’ll see to it next time that we have plenty of gas.  You can bet on that.  I don’t care, but I know how he felt.
I didn’t get a letter from home this morning.  I think they have forgotten they have a son.  I guess I’ll have to write home and ask for money.  Then they will know they have one.  I’m going to call them tonight and see what the trouble it.

 

Mary you do just what you think you would rather and what you feel that you should about leaving your mother on Mother’s Day.  I won’t blame you a bit if you want to stay there.  Do as you think best honey.  That’s the way I want you to do.

 

I must stop and do a bit of studying before lunch.

 

Love, 

 

Jim

 

Leave a comment

Filed under 1930